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We like it slow

Posted about 3 years ago by Annika in Personal and Products

We appreciate fast and efficient workers, so please don’t get the wrong idea. We strongly believe though that we need to dial back to SLOW in many other ways. Here is to what we have written on our awesome freeset Tees…

Bake slow

Good things take time. Good bread takes a lot of time.

The average supermarket loaf is developed from flour into a sliced and packaged product within 3 hours, thanks to the Chorleywood Bread Process. This process was invented to save time, as time is money. While it saves the baker time and money it robs the consumer of most of the benefits that the grains involved were holding in store.

We chose to be oldfashioned when it comes to fermenting grains or flour. It normally takes us between 8 to 48 hours. And this is just the ferment. It then needs to be baked and cooled until it finds its place on a bread rack.

And we have a damn good reason to do it this way: it’s way better nutritionally! Sourdough breads are healthy. They feed us. They nourish us. They help us maintain and grow our bodies.

Eat slow

When I was in Primary school I was told to chew my food 38 times before swallowing it. That is a lot of chewing and it may be very beneficial for nutrient absorbtion and thus for our bodies and overall health. My point though is the health of a much bigger picture. The health of our community, our environment. The health of our planet.

If we keep eating the way most people eat (and consume in general) in western society we are going to hit the wall.

We often get asked why there are no ‘proper’ german products in our Bakery. With ‘proper’ people mean german branded products imported from Germany. Easy answer to that one: Because New Zealand has got great quality ingredients which can be used to make almost anything that you could buy in a german deli. 

So would we really want to support more planes flying around the globe, producing more CO2 in order to support an economy which we have opted out of? No, absolutely not!

We live in the Bay of Plenty, in a Land of Plenty. So much stuff grows in our backyard, in our neighbours backyard and on the farms surrounding us. We source our fruit and veggies from Waihis Fantail Gardens (www.pathways.co.nz) and from The Veggie and Onion Place in Katikati (www.growlink.co.nz). Great quality grains come from the South Island of New Zealand. We sell Icecream made in Waihi by John and Barbara Thomas (www.thomasicecream.co.nz), Molasses Toffees made by our friend Elette from Waikino (www.blackkauri.co.nz) and Olives and their Oil made on a biodynamic farm in Katikati (www.olive-oils.co.nz).

Buy local, eat local, reduce the carbon footprint, grow your own and barter with your neighbours. Eat slow. Our children will thank you for it.

Live slow

One crucial thing to remember, I think, is that we only get one shot at this life. I don’t know what may follow, so I am sticking to this one given time frame and try and make the most of it. Not the most in quantity, but the most in intensity.

My life is busy. I look after our three little children 24/7, unless I am on Bakery duty and Ron is guarding them. I don’t have time for much else. In fact I don’t have time for anything else but these children and the Bakery. But I can choose to involve my children in the huge amount of time I invest into food prep and we all have a great time together doing something meaningful, yummy and healthy at the same time.

We take our time. We plant and sow together, we water and prune and we pick and harvest. We tend to our chicken, pigs and rabbits together (yes, the latter are for eating too and the kids are as excited when they get to cuddle the young as they are when it comes to dishing them out at dinner time) and they come along to visit the local cows once a week when we get our milk. They then have their turn at stirring the milk when we are making cheese and yogurt at home.

When Ron brings home some fish the girls hold the hose and help him clean the carcasses. They watch him feather our own poultry and they love calling into his kitchen on slaughter day when he is cutting up the pigs.

It is respectful and it is learning and most often full of anticipation of a nourishing meal. 

We live without television and we walk where we can. We play make believe and we dance in the rain. It’s the children pace.

Taking our time is highly rewarding - emotionally but also from a health point of view - we feed our bodies and souls food (not only edible stuff) that has been created with love and time. 

 

Spread the word, wear the word - our Tees are for sale!

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